Archives For September 2015

CH 93: A Bit Of a Catch-Up

Helen —  September 25, 2015 — 1 Comment
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ch93

This week has whooshed by: I’m not quite sure how. Lots going on as always! So many projects…it’s a blur of creativity and day-to-day work, and sometimes you just need a moment to stand back and take it all in. I thought I’d take this opportunity to catch you up on the things that are happening in my world these days.

Show Sponsors

Today’s show is sponsored by The Fibre Co, and their beautiful Acadia yarn. If you want a preview of the magical way this yarn knits up, you can see in in action in the two tone sample of my pattern Whispering Island!

TheFibreCo_Logo CH

Acadia is named after the oldest American national park east of the Mississippi river, a place of natural beauty where the sea and mountains meet, slopes are densely forested and wild blueberries abound. Acadia National Park is in the state of Maine, The Fibre Co.’s birthplace.  The yarn inspired by this beautiful region has a rustic look and a soft hand. A subtle tweed effect is created by the silk noil that is combined with a heathered base made from fine merino wool and brown baby alpaca. The yarn is a classic DK weight and makes a beautiful textured fabric that is perfect for next to the skin accessories as well as garments.

You can get your hands on some Acadia of your own at our other sponsor’s shop, Meadow Yarn:

Meadow Yarn 

Meadow Yarn is an inviting online retailer selling yarn, needles and notions. It’s a small, family business based in rural Suffolk in the UK. Meadow Yarn was born out of a passion for beautiful yarn and knitting accessories and aims to bring you a range of great products. Yarns stocked include madelinetosh, Eden Cottage Yarn, the Fibre Co and many more.

Show Links

Since today’s show is a little informal, this is a bit of a mix of WIPs, KAL progress, and things that have my attention this week.

Times Square: Still really enjoying this pattern by Norah Gaughan. I think I might need to change needles, since my super-sharp lace needles might be slowing me down. Any ideas?

Summertide MKAL: As always, the threads on the Curious Handmade Ravelry Group are full of great chatter, fun, and questions. The #SummertideMKAL hashtag is full of amazing WIPs on Instagram, but it’s all spoilers so keep that in mind before you look! We also have a new sponsor for the MKAL! Maria Elena Bliss is joining Meadow Yarns and Skein Australia as sponsors for the Summertide MKAL! Maria Elena makes the most beautiful project bags (I have a few myself,) and she’s very generously donated one as a prize! Whoever snags this one will be very lucky.

Curious Handmade Wardrobe Challenge: I got to do some sewing this week, finally! I worked on the adorable Dress Shirt by Merchant and Mills. I’m almost finished, which is very exciting.

Speaking of a handmade wardrobe, one of my heroes in this area is Karen Templer from The Fringe Association. (She gave us a brilliant interview here on the blog a few weeks ago.) Karen is launching Slow Fashion October, an intoxicating and inspiring idea that has a lot of fun and important crossover with the Curious Handmade Wardrobe Challenge. She’s really going deep into the reasons many of us are interested in making our own clothes. I encourage you to go check it out, I think you’ll love it.

The Pebble Beach Workshop: I did a photography course recently at Makelight Studios: one of several photography courses that have been really creatively rich for me. I love the space that Emily Quinton has created so much that when she announced that she was opening it up to other creators I jumped at the chance to host a workshop there.

So on Friday the 23rd of October I’ll be running a lace-knitting workshop based on Pebble Beach. Emily will also be on hand to help us photograph our work, which is really exciting, and may even get you thinking in a new way about your knitting (I know it has for me.) Places are very limited, so if you’re interested, please do book early!

A chance to help with the refugee crisis by doing something you love:

For the month of September, knitting designer Maria Magnusson is donating all profits from all of her pattern sales to charities working with the Syrian Refugee crisis. This is tremendously generous, and it’s a win-win: you get a beautiful pattern while knowing that your money is going to an excellent cause.

Maria’s Instagram

I mention two of her patterns specifically:

Brolly

Promenade

She has many gorgeous designs, so please have a look and see if anything catches your eye. There’s just under a week left in September, so now’s the time

That’s all for the show notes this week! Thank you so much for listening. Until next time, happy knitting!

Ch 92: We won! (And lots of WIPs)

Helen —  September 18, 2015 — 1 Comment
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Another very busy week for Curious Handmade, and this episode is about all the things I’ve been up to! The most exciting thing was my trip to the New Media Europe Conference and the UK Podcast Awards over the weekend. To make a long story short, we won! It made my year, and it’s all thanks to you. I couldn’t do this without you, and you inspire me every day. Huge congrats to my fellow knitting podcaster Jo Milmine, host of ShinyBees! She took home the gong for Most Engaged Audience, and I’m so thrilled for her. Two knitters sweeping the awards caused a bit of a stir!

Show Sponsors

Today’s show is sponsored by The Fibre Co, and their beautiful Acadia yarn. If you want to see how fabulous this looks in a project, take a look at the two tone sample of my pattern Whispering Island!

TheFibreCo_Logo CH

Acadia is named after the oldest American national park east of the Mississippi river, a place of natural beauty where the sea and mountains meet, slopes are densely forested and wild blueberries abound. Acadia National Park is in the state of Maine, The Fibre Co.’s birthplace.  The yarn inspired by this beautiful region has a rustic look and a soft hand. A subtle tweed effect is created by the silk noil that is combined with a heathered base made from fine merino wool and brown baby alpaca. The yarn is a classic DK weight and makes a beautiful textured fabric that is perfect for next to the skin accessories as well as garments.

You can get your hands on some Acadia of your own at our other sponsor’s shop, Meadow Yarn:

Meadow Yarn 

Meadow Yarn is an inviting online retailer selling yarn, needles and notions. It’s a small, family business based in rural Suffolk in the UK. Meadow Yarn was born out of a passion for beautiful yarn and knitting accessories and aims to bring you a range of great products. Yarns stocked include madelinetosh, Eden Cottage Yarn, the Fibre Co and many more.

Show Links

I talked a bit about some of the wonderful podcasts that inspired me to start the Curious Handmade Podcast:

Stash and Burn

Knitmore Girls

Doubleknit

iMake

Hoxton Handmade – Electric Sheep Podcast

A Playful Day

Knitting Pipeline

 

I have a long discussion about my journey towards organising my house and life, inspired by this book:

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing

If you’ve tried this, I want to hear about your experiences! How are you doing? Does your house stay organised? Please leave me a comment with your tips!

What’s in the WIP

Times Square by Norah Gaughan

I brought this along to the conference with me and I’m making great progress! It’s such a fun knit.

Summertide MKAL

The KAL is roaring along! We have close to 700 projects on Ravelry, which is just amazing. Join us in the chatter thread to see what everyone’s up to, find encouragement, and share your progress! The group very lively and supportive, and it’s honestly not too late to join the fun. We’ll be going until the end of October, and we still have people just starting the first clue.

Curious Handmade Wardrobe Challenge

I didn’t get any sewing done this week, but I’ve been enjoying the treasure trove of advice and information that’s going on in the Ravelry thread. There are a lot of conversations about creating better fitting clothes. It’s something we’ve covered a bit on the podcast before, so here are some people and resources who can help:

Amy Herzog

Her great Custom fit patterns

My interview with Amy

 

Elizabeth Doherty

Her book Top Down: Reimagining Set-In Sleeve Design (do you want an affiliate link?)

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Top-Down-Reimagining-Set-In-Sleeve/dp/0985299088

My interview with Elizabeth

 

Cal Patch

Her new Pattern Drafting With Knits course on Creative Bug

Pattern Drafting Course with Cal Patch

My interview with Cal

Contest winners!

Back when I posted my interview with Elizabeth, she kindly gave me two copies of her new book to give away to my listeners. I have an ebook and a signed copy. I’ve just done a little draw and here are the two winners!

EBook Winner: Zoë

With this comment:

August 29, 2015 at 1:58 pm

Loved this episode. All the patterns in this book are timeless and classic. I love the lookof set in sleeves in knitted garments and an intrigued by Elizabeth’s new method of toptown set in sleeves knitting. My favorite piece is San Serif. It looks like it would be a go to piece in my wardrobe. Thanks again Helen!

Signed Copy Winner: HappyLuckyAlix

With this comment

September 1, 2015 at 4:48 pm

Great episode; I’m still mulling my handmade wardrobe undertakings, and loving the Ravelry thread discussion. My favourite pattern from Elizabeth’s book is the Sans Serif, but it’s a tough choice; they all look very knittable and wearable.

Events

It’s official! Registration is now open for my Pebble Beach Workshop at Makelight Studios! It’s going to be a fabulous day and I can’t wait to work with some of you in person.

That’s everything for this week! Until next time, happy knitting!

CH 91: Knitting All The Things!

Amanda —  September 11, 2015 — Leave a comment
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Ch 91

It’s a very fun filled week here at Curious Handmade, with the launch of the Summertide MKAL, the continuing Handmade Wardrobe Challenge, getting ready for the UK Podcast Awards, along with all the regular bustle of everyday life. Because of all that, this is a slightly short episode, where I mostly catch up with the many many things in my WIP queue.

Show Sponsors

Today’s show is sponsored by The Fibre Co, and their wonderfully sweet and soft Acadia yarn. If you want to see how beautifully this knits up, take a look at the two tone sample of my pattern Whispering Island!

TheFibreCo_Logo CH

Acadia is named after the oldest American national park east of the Mississippi river, a place of natural beauty where the sea and mountains meet, slopes are densely forested and wild blueberries abound. Acadia National Park is in the state of Maine, The Fibre Co.’s birthplace.  The yarn inspired by this beautiful region has a rustic look and a soft hand. A subtle tweed effect is created by the silk noil that is combined with a heathered base made from fine merino wool and brown baby alpaca. The yarn is a classic DK weight and makes a beautiful textured fabric that is perfect for next to the skin accessories as well as garments.

You can get your hands on some Acadia of your own at our other sponsor’s shop, Meadow Yarn:

Meadow Yarn 

Meadow Yarn is an inviting online retailer selling yarn, needles and notions. It’s a small, family business based in rural Suffolk in the UK. Meadow Yarn was born out of a passion for beautiful yarn and knitting accessories and aims to bring you a range of great products. Yarns stocked include madelinetosh, Eden Cottage Yarn, the Fibre Co and many more.

Show Links

Project Paddington Facebook Page

Yarn and Pointy Sticks and the Knit Share Love KAL

What’s in the WIP

Cave Point by Paula I’m loving this and I’m thinking I’ll extend the border, because I have extra yarn and also because I’d love to keep this addictive knit going a bit longer.

Times Square by Norah Gaughan This is part of my Curious Handmade Wardrobe Challenge. I’m using The Fibre Co’s Knighstbridge in the Beaverdon colourway.

Earl Grey Hat by Clare Devine. This is adorable and I need a new hat!

The Summertide MKAL, of course!

That should just about do it for this “minisode.” If you haven’t come on board for the MKAL or the Curious Handmade Wardrobe Challenge yet, just come visit us in the Curious Handmade Ravelry Group. We’re a very friendly and supportive bunch and I find inspiration there every day. We’d love to have you join us!

 

Summertide MKAL

The long wait is over, and the very first clue in the Summertide MKAL is now available! Everyone has been chomping at the bit over at the Curious Handmade Ravelry Forums, and excitement is running high.

Thanks to our very generous sponsors, we have two enviable prizes for this KAL:

£50 voucher from Meadow Yarns

2 skeins of hand-dyed yarn from Skein Australia

The MKAL will be running until the end of October, so although today is the official start, you’ve got loads of time to join in. The pattern is on sale now on Ravelry, and the first clue will be waiting for you when you click “buy”!

Here’s the rest of the release dates:

Clue #2 – Thursday 17 September
Clue #3– Thursday 24 September
Clue #4 – Thursday 1 October

So far we already have over 560 project pages up and ready to go. Are you ready to add yours?

Happy knitting!

 

This very special guest post began its life as a message on the Curious Handmade Ravelry Group, in the Summertide MKAL thread. There have been so many wonderful conversations going on about colour, but this post just jumped off the page. Shelley, also known as MisKnitz on Ravelry, wrote this very inspiring piece about how she decided on colours for Summertide. It’s a captivating example of just how personal these project choices are for us as creative people, and the language she uses is so beautiful and evocative. It really captures so much of the soul I put into the Summertide pattern, and Shelley hasn’t even seen the first clue yet! I thought her process and storytelling deserved a wider audience, so I asked her if I could share it here with the wider Curious Handmade community. I know you’ll love it as much as I did. 

*****

In choosing colors for my project, I really pondered Helen’s description of her inspiration for this MKAL pattern – that glorious feeling of summer and how when this time of year rolls around, we want to hold on to it as long as we can – and asked myself the question, “What does summer mean to me?” The answer was easy …

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I live in Minnesota. Land of 10,000 Lakes. (Actually 11,842 named lakes of a certain size and over 15,000 lakes when the smaller, unnamed bodies of water are included.) Land of Sky Blue Water. (“Sky blue water” is the English translation of the Dakota word “Minnesota.”) When one thinks “Minnesota,” one thinks “lakes.”

Growing up and living in Minnesota, my life has always revolved around lakes. I’ve spent countless hours over the years on and in our beautiful lakes. To this day, I spend as many hours as I can enjoying them – almost every weekend from May through September, my family and I are at the lake cabin.

So once I gave it some thought, choosing colors for this project was easy. Lake = Blue. However, not just “blue.” Spend time on a lake, and not only will you see every shade of blue imaginable, you will seen grays, greens, purples, whites, yellows, pinks and oranges. All, however, touched with blue. The light blue, almost clear, shallow water. The navy and purple of deep, deep waters. The gray and black of a reflected stormy sky and the bright crisp blue of a clear sky. The smokey white reflections of passing clouds. The bright, foamy turquoise of a boat’s wake. The greenish water surrounding a field of rushes, cattails and lily pads. The pinks, oranges and yellows of the rising sun on the calm morning lake and the reddish glow of the sun setting on the lake’s western edge, all bathed in the blue of the lake and sky. The purple-black bottomless depths of a lake at night with the reflected stars dancing on the surface. The roiling steel blue-gray and white of whitecaps on a windy day. It’s all there. It’s all blue.

So, I threw out my notion of picking colors just because they looked good together and they happened to be in my stash. I discarded thoughts of using warm fall colors or the deep jewel tones often associated with winter. Yes, I will be wearing the shawl during those seasons, but the point of the shawl is to capture the feeling of summer and wrap myself in it during the cold, gray days of winter. Perhaps this winter I will ice skate or ski on the frozen lake wearing my Summertide shawl and I will compare the colors of an awake summer lake to the sleeping lake of winter – still beautiful but without the depth and variety of color of a lake in summer.

With all of that in mind, with my large TML stash laid out in front of me, my hands instantly reached for these two skeins. The Celadon is breathtaking. I’ve had this skein in my stash for years and have never been able to bring myself to knit with it. I knew the project had to be special. It is predominantly a cool greenish blue, but take a closer look and you’ll see pale, washed out blue; smokey lavender; light, steely-gray; fresh light green; jewel-like turquoise; and a hint of dusky pink. All colors represented in the lake depending on the time of day, the weather, the depth of the water, and the movement of the water. This color represents the ever-changing color of the lake.

misknitz

But, always, there is the blue. The blue is predominant, and the second, darker skein is that base. That “ever present” nature of the lake. Despite it’s changeable mood, the blue personality of the lake is always there. Ink is a deep, deep blue that looks like a rich, dark purple depending on the light and the colors that surround it. To me it represents the solid base of the lake – the inky darkness of the deepest waters. The lake’s foundation in the earth.

misknitz2

As with most yarns, the colors change depending on the light and which colors they’re surrounded by. The Celadon can look very greenish or very blueish. The pink and lavender tones can be very noticeable or not so much. The Ink can look like a deep navy blue or like a royal purple. The surprise of seeing which colors come through will be part of the charm of this shawl just as they are a part of the lake!

I hope to wear the completed shawl and feel surrounded by the lake and capture that feeling of summer all year long.

Thank you so much to Shelley for allowing me to repost this lovely reflection on the blog. There are still a couple of days left before the Summertide MKAL officially begins, so if you’d like to join Shelley, myself, and over 480 other knitters (so far!), come over to Ravelery! The pattern is on sale now, and the first clue will arrive on September 10th. 

CH 90: Heartfelt and Summertide

Helen —  September 4, 2015 — 3 Comments
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Show Sponsors

Today’s show is sponsored by The Fibre Co, and their wonderfully soft and gorgeous Acadia yarn. If you want to see how wonderfully this knits up, take a look at the two tone sample of my pattern Whispering Island!

TheFibreCo_Logo CH

Acadia is named after the oldest American national park east of the Mississippi river, a place of natural beauty where the sea and mountains meet, slopes are densely forested and wild blueberries abound. Acadia National Park is in the state of Maine, The Fibre Co.’s birthplace.  The yarn inspired by this beautiful region has a rustic look and a soft hand. A subtle tweed effect is created by the silk noil that is combined with a heathered base made from fine merino wool and brown baby alpaca. The yarn is a classic DK weight and makes a beautiful textured fabric that is perfect for next to the skin accessories as well as garments.

You can get your hands on some Acadia of your own at our other sponsor’s shop, Meadow Yarn:

Meadow Yarn 

Meadow Yarn is an inviting online retailer selling yarn, needles and notions. It’s a small, family business based in rural Suffolk in the UK. Meadow Yarn was born out of a passion for beautiful yarn and knitting accessories and aims to bring you a range of great products. Yarns stocked include madelinetosh, Eden Cottage Yarn, the Fibre Co and many more.

Introduction

I talk about an article in the Independent – 5 practical ways you can help refugees trying to find safety in Europe

Also the Childhood Bags fundraising effort.

What’s in the WIP?

Summertide MKAL

Hold on to summer with 8 weeks of knitting, camaraderie and mystery!

Summertide MKAL

CHWChallenge-button

Curious Handmade Wardrobe Challenge 

Announcements

September 5th is the Great London Yarn Crawl! There will be a special pop up marketplace, and there’s going to be an Indie Designer Spotlight stand. Several up and coming designers will be rotating through, and I’m lucky enough to be among them.

I’ll be there from 4pm to 5pm at the Chelsea Old Town Hall.

Stop by! It’s going to be a really fun event.

Thanks again for listening! Happy knitting ….until next week.

 * * * * * 

I am a Craftsy affiliate so if you would like to support Curious Handmade when you are buying supplies or a class, click through the Craftsy banner below: it means I’ll get a small commission. Thank you so much.

Craftsy

As all the excitement around the Summertide MKAL continues to grow, I’m stealing a moment to return to our ongoing Curious Handmade Wardrobe Challenge. I have another great interview for you, this time from one of my handmade wardrobe heroes, Karen Templer from the exceptional Fringe Supply Co (The shop’s tagline “Nice things for makers” is an understatement…her things are gorgeous.) She also writes an insanely inspirational blog, Fringe Association. Karen agreed to share her knowledge and journey towards a handmade wardrobe with us today, and I’m so happy that she did. Welcome Karen!

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Photo credit: Kathy Cadigan

Photo credit: Kathy Cadigan

Tell us a little about why you’re interested in having a handmade wardrobe.

First and foremost, I’m a control freak. 🙂 I want what I want, when I want it. But there’s also enormous creativity and joy and peace of mind in making one’s own clothes.

Which came first: Knitting, crochet or sewing?

My mom taught me to sew when I was young enough that I don’t really remember it, so I feel like I’ve just always known. But I have sewn only very sporadically during my adult years. I definitely knew more about sewing when I was in junior high school than I know right now, but I’m relearning pretty quickly.

I also was shown how to knit when I was a kid but I didn’t take to it. I did love crochet as a kid. But a friend taught me to knit in October 2011 and I was instantly obsessed. Have been knitting like a maniac ever since.

How often do you wear something you’ve made?

In the winter, you’ll find me wearing a hand knit sweater most days. I have fewer warm-weather clothes that I’ve either sewn or knitted, so less often in the warm months.

Do you want to have more of your wardrobe be handmade?

Photo credit: Karen Templer

Photo credit: Karen Templer

I’m in awe of people who are able to wear handmade every day, and love the idea of an entirely handmade wardrobe, but it’s not realistic for me. I run a business (Fringe Supply Co.) and a daily blog (Fringe Association), have very little free time, and I’m very slow — especially when it comes to sewing. I always have a lot of big plans about all the clothes I’m going to make and then manage to produce only a fraction of them. But I’m pretty committed at this point to not buying clothes made in faraway factories under unknown conditions, if it can be avoided, which is a big shift after a lifetime of mall clothes. I’m wearing things longer, buying less, and spending more per item to get things that are produced by known humans in known conditions. That might be a piece by a local designer sewn in a studio I’m able to visit, or something by a brand that isn’t local to me but is transparent about how and where production is happening, and ideally also about where the fabric comes from. I love supporting makers and small businesses, and want to be able to feel good about every garment in my closet, whether I made it myself or not.

Photo Credit: Karen Templer

Photo Credit: Karen Templer

Do you relate to “fashion” or “style” /or “capsule wardrobe /Or uniform? Do you have a uniform?

I have fairly limited tastes, so that does lead me to some semblance of a wardrobe. I’m mostly denim and neutrals, classic shapes but maybe put together in slightly unconventional ways here and there?

My house was built in 1953 and has old-school closets — not walk-ins. My closet has a little door, behind which is a shelf above a hanging rod. It’s small, in other words, and I’m determined not to exceed (or even max out, actually) its capacity. When you have fewer clothes, you want them all to work together and to be of good, lasting quality. So I do lean toward the “capsule” concept.

How did you start on your journey to a HMW?  

In the 80s, my school years, I did a lot of alteration/customization of store-bought clothes. Fashion was a ton of fun then — pegging your mens 501s, tailoring hospital scrubs, embellishing everything. But I didn’t make a lot of my own clothes from scratch until I started knitting sweaters. (I cast on my first sweater in the third month that I knew how to knit and have been knitting mainly garments ever since.) Making sweaters made me long to make other clothes for myself as well, which led me back to sewing.

Who inspires you in this journey?  

Beautiful Japanese sashiko thread, available from Fringe Supply Company. Photo Credit: Karen Templer

Beautiful Japanese sashiko thread, available from Fringe Supply Company. Photo Credit: Karen Templer

The entire handmade community, truly. As soon as I learned to knit, I started scouring the web for good blogs, which led me to lots of inspiring knitters and sewers both. Instagram is so awash in talented people I wish I could spend whole days just combing through hashtags. It’s so inspiring, all of it, and there are a lot of clever, thoughtful individuals who either got me thinking or taught me skills or whatever the case may be. Way too many people to name. But at the moment, I’m spurred on a daily basis by some really good friends in the industry who are incredibly prolific makers: Jaime and Amber of Fancy Tiger Crafts; Kate Gagnon Osborn of Kelbourne Woolens, who also sews most of her non-knitted clothes; Jen Beeman of Grainline Studio, who is also a knitter; and Anna Maria Horner, who is also about to get me started on quilting! Because that’s what I have time for, right?

When you choose a pattern, do you think about how wearable it is? Do you think about how well it will go with your other clothes?  

Absolutely. Obsessively. Like I said, my closet is really small and I only want stuff in there that can pull its weight. And again, I’m slow, so everything I choose to spend precious time on really needs to be worth it. I’ve always had a shopping rule that I’m not allowed to buy anything unless I can instantly make at least three great outfits out of it with other pieces I already own. With handmade, I’m trying to follow the same general rule, but at the same time I can actually plan out a whole wardrobe — calculating how an array of pieces will work together once they all exist. Of course, the challenge is to get them all to exist! But I do spend a lot of time sketching and planning and choosing the right fabric or yarn. Planning might be my favorite part.

What’s the most wearable item you’ve made?

Probably my charcoal grey Bellows cardigan. I can literally put it on over just about anything I own! And would wear it every single day from October through March if that were socially acceptable.

bellows

What pattern(s) would you nominate as “highly wearable”?

I’m not often one to make patterns as written/drafted – I tend to find things that are in the neighborhood of what i’m wanting and then bend them to my will. I think the key is knowing what’s wearable for you and then finding ways to get there.

Do you have any suggestions of great resources for new sewists?

Jen’s blog, Grainline Studio, and the Colette site are both chock full of great info. I’m not as well-versed in sewing resources as I’d like, but those are two I feel like i’m always learning from. But I also say find people on Instagram whose taste you vibe with (check hashtags like #handmadewardrobe and #memade and #knittersofinstagram and such) and pay attention not only to what they have to say about the patterns they’re posting about, but also the comments from everyone else. There really is a lot of wisdom in that crowd.

So many thanks to Karen for joining us on the blog today! I really love hearing people’s stories: it spurs me on in my own quest for a more creative life. For even more inspiration and wisdom from Karen, you can find her online here:

Fringe Supply Co.

Fringe Association

Instagram

*****

So, are you onboard with the Curious Handmade Wardrobe Challenge yet? There’s still lots of time, so take a peek at our very active thread on Ravelry. #CHWChallenge